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Indian Journal of Law and Human Behavior

Volume  4, Issue 2, Jul-Dec 2018, Pages 179-187

 

Original Article

Food Law Regime in India: Meeting the Global Standards
Food Law Regime in India: Meeting the Global Standards
*Faculty Associate at School of Law, KIIT Deemed to be University, Bhubaneswar, Odisha 751024, India.
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DOI: DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.21088/ijlhb.2454.7107.4218.5

Abstract

  Implementation of Food standards to ensure Food safety is a serious public health concern in the world especially in countries like India. The challenges of feeding a large, geographically dispersed population, millions of whom are poor and malnourished, are immense. This has led to the proliferation of illegal, dishonest, and bootleg suppliers and slipshod government policies. The results are detrimental to public health, particularly for vulnerable communities. These crises further compromise international perceptions, indicating poor governance, weak political will, inadequate policies and lack of enforcement. The path to development is not exclusively about economic growth, jobs, and infrastructure. Clear and consistent food regulatory policy, and their implementation are both imperative for growth and the inherent responsibility of responsible and progressive governments. Food scandals have plagued India for decades. The case of Nestlé’s Maggi instant noodles has thrust the issue of food safety into the national political spotlight. Additives such as monosodium glutamate (MSG), which some consider a possible health concern, have been detected in Maggi noodles, although  the company has consistently denied using such additives. After the Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI) discovered unhealthy levels of lead in the noodles, FSSAI banned Maggi.

Keywords: Food Law Regime; Monosodium Glutamate; FSSAI.


Corresponding Author : Aratrika Deb, Faculty Associate at School of Law, KIIT Deemed to be University, Bhubaneswar, Odisha 751024, India.